Roni Ben-Hur © Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

Tomajazz recupera… Roni Ben-Hur: Expandiendo la tradición, por Sergio Cabanillas y Arturo Mora

Roni Ben-Hur © Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

Roni Ben-Hur
© Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

Sabes, a mucha gente la música le conmueve, y quieren corresponder de alguna manera, y buscan formas de hacerlo, y entonces miran a la industria del Jazz y la encuentran muy descorazonadora. Creo que muchos de ellos toman el camino equivocado y dicen: “primero vamos a buscar una compañía que saque el CD”, “busquemos primero una sala donde promocionar el CD”, pero creo que acabarían haciendo más si sencillamente dijeran: “hagamos el CD”. Es importante que a esta gente a la que realmente le gusta la música y quiere hacer algo al respecto diga: “hagámoslo”. Como si fuera un pintor: “no sé dónde pondré el cuadro, no sé qué museo lo exhibirá”, pero, por favor, píntalo. Hagamos lo mismo con los músicos, y las cosas funcionarán.

Leer Roni Ben-Hur: Expandiendo la tradición, por Sergio Cabanillas y Arturo Mora (publicada en marzo de 2007)




Roni Ben-Hur © Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

Tomajazz recupera… Roni Ben-Hur: Expanding the tradition, by Sergio Cabanillas and Arturo Mora

Roni Ben-Hur © Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

Roni Ben-Hur
© Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

You know, there’s a lot of people who are deeply affected by the music, and they want to give something back, and they look for ways to do it, and then they look at the Jazz industry and it’s very discouraging. I think a lot of them go about it in the wrong way of saying “well, let’s find a label to put the CD out first”, “let’s find a venue to promote the CD first”, and I think they’ll get more done if they would just say “let’s make the CD”. It’s important that this people who really love the music and want to do something about the music say: “let’s just do it!”, so it gets created, like a painter: “I don’t know where I’m going to put it, I don’t know what museum is going to carry it”, but, please, paint it. Same thing with musicians and then things will fall into place.

Leer Roni Ben-Hur: Expanding the tradition, by Sergio Cabanillas and Arturo Mora (publicado originalmente en marzo de 2007)




Roni Ben-Hur: Expanding the tradition, by Sergio Cabanillas and Arturo Mora

Keepin' It Open

Keepin’ It Open

Israel-born guitarist Roni Ben-Hur played three concerts and took part in a jazz seminar in Madrid (Spain) last February. A frequent sideman of pianist Barry Harris, Ben-Hur is about to release his fourth CD, Keepin’ It Open (Motema) along with Ronnie Mathews, Lewis Nash, Santi DeBriano, Jeremy Pelt and Steve Kroon. Ben-Hur, who’s also an accomplished educator, will publish a new Jazz method on harmonic concepts for guitar sometime next Spring.

During his sojourn in Madrid he was interviewed on February 1 by Sergio Cabanillas for his radio show “Parallel Universes” at Onda Verde (Madrid 107.9 FM). New pieces from Keepin’ It Open were played on the show, which also had Tomajazz editor Arturo Mora and guitarist Héctor García Roel helping out with the language barrier.

Roni Ben-Hur / Arturo Mora / Sergio Cabanillas / Hector García Roel © 2007 Haim Ben-Hur

Roni Ben-Hur / Arturo Mora / Sergio Cabanillas / Héctor García Roel
© 2007 Haim Ben-Hur

ARTURO MORA: You were born in Israel to a Tunisian family. In your website you talk about how important the celebratory side of music is in your family. If you had to compare the celebratory side of jazz with its intellectual facets, which one would tip the balance for you?

RONI BEN-HUR: I think it’s very important to keep them combined, that’s what makes this music what it is. The celebratory part of Jazz comes from the people, it’s music that is derived from people, not necessarily people who studied music, not necessarily people who went to the Conservatory, but people who came out into this music from their tradition, from their homes, from their houses of worship, that’s what gives Jazz the element of spontaneity, originality, the fact that everyone can be very individual. And the fact that this is music that is well studied (musicians spend their time expanding their understanding of music) is what makes it so sophisticated.

ARTURO MORA: Talking about the development of Jazz, in your upcoming album there’s a traditional Israeli song, there’s bossa nova, there’s a Spanish song by Enrique Granados, and in the previous CD, Signatures, there were two compositions by Heitor Villa-Lobos and another one by Jobim. Tell us about the challenge you face when you adapt songs that were conceived in musical territories outside the Jazz idiom?

RONI BEN-HUR: I think it’s not such a big challenge as long as you’re not trying to be a purist. Before the advent of recording equipment, the only way music was passed along was through writing. Still there was always room for interpretations. People were able to interpret out of the composer’s music, and re-arrange it. I think that many pieces lend themselves to it, and not necessarily to be played note by note as in the arrangement it was originally conceived.

ARTURO MORA: What pieces from other musical contexts would you like to adapt in the near future?

RONI BEN-HUR: Well, I think I would… I couldn’t tell you now what it would be. I know that there are old Israeli traditional songs that I would like to do, and also music from the religious literature, from the Sephardic religious literature. Spanish music is music I always felt very close to, and flamenco music too, but I couldn’t really say my next project would include this and that…

Roni Ben-Hur © Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

Roni Ben-Hur
© Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

ARTURO MORA: What would you emphasize from what you’ve learned playing with Barry Harris?

RONI BEN-HUR: That music is there for beauty, it’s there to touch and move people. It’s supposed to move people on an emotional level, and not impress them on an intellectual level.

ARTURO MORA: Having played with Barry Harris, John Hicks, Chris Anderson… harmonically speaking, how do you combine guitar and piano?

RONI BEN-HUR: It’s not difficult if you listen. The people you mentioned are big listeners, and there’s one more thing I’ve learned from them: as long as you listen to one another, it’s not difficult, it’s like two people who are very, very bright on one specific topic, but they can have a conversation, and they can both present an idea together. If the person you play with listens to you, and is always receptive to what you’re doing, then there’s always room for what you’re doing.

SERGIO CABANILLAS: From the technical point of view, besides listening and interacting, how do you distribute the harmonic work when you’re playing with a piano player in order to avoid ‘stepping’ into each other’s range?

RONI BEN-HUR: I don’t think there’s a set rule. The easy way out is that the piano has it. The next easier thing is: you trade. In other words, the piano plays some, the guitar plays some, but the most rewarding way is when you get into a combination, when you stay alert and you listen constantly, and you’re very sensitive to each other, and then it works out.

SERGIO CABANILLAS: So you can conceive it as sharing the register: less weight on the piano’s left hand while the guitar is playing on the lower strings and vice versa on the higher notes?

RONI BEN-HUR: Yes, but it doesn’t have to be determined ahead of time. All those problems solve themselves when the listening is there. If you work it all out ahead of time and the listening is not there, it’s not going to help.

SERGIO CABANILLAS: How do you feel about John Hicks’ loss?

Roni Ben-Hur © Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

Roni Ben-Hur
© Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

RONI BEN-HUR: Very hard. When John passed away – it was not long ago, actually I had played with him a couple of weeks before – I was caught by surprise. I felt very close to him, I felt that he was a very close friend. I went to his memorial in New York at St. Peter’s church (sort of the ‘Jazz church’) and they have memorial services for Jazz musicians; everybody who got up and spoke was talking about how close they were to John Hicks and what a great and close friend he was to them. To me it was a lesson to see what a wonderful person he was and what a great testimony to his life that all the people he touched felt like he was their best friend.

SERGIO CABANILLAS: And on the musical side?

RONI BEN-HUR: Musically he was wonderful to work with. He was a world class pianist, composer, arranger and bandleader, but when he worked in my band and we did the record, he was completely receptive to anything that I wanted to do, and all his purpose was to make me get the sound that I was looking for.

ARTURO MORA: Regarding your wife Amy London, the great Jazz and Broadway singer, how has she influenced you musically?

RONI BEN-HUR: Sure; for one thing, she’s a wonderful vocalist and she has a great new CD with John Hicks on it. It should come out in May. She’s influenced me in many ways, and I’ve grown musically with her just by working with a great singer. She’s also connected me to the Great American Songbook, the literature that comes out of Broadway, musicals and movies from the thirties and forties and fifties.

Roni Ben-Hur © Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

Roni Ben-Hur
© Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

ARTURO MORA: You’ve published a jazz guitar book named Talk Jazz. What’s the difference between “playing Jazz” and “talking Jazz”?

RONI BEN-HUR: If you play Jazz right, you talk Jazz. The book is called Talk Jazz because it deals directly with the language and the vocabulary of the Jazz world. It comes to help students get acquainted with the vocabulary, with specific ways of playing things that sound in the Jazz idiom, just theoretical concept but actual musical sentences.

ARTURO MORA: As a Jazz educator, do you learn teaching? What kind of feedback do you get from your students?

RONI BEN-HUR: I learn a great deal from the students. When you teach something and you speak it out, for one thing it leaves you, and something else has to come in, so you keep growing. Also, whenever you teach something, you hear it and you examine it again and re-learn it, and that’s another growth process.

ARTURO MORA: There’s an old saying in education that goes like: “If you don’t know how to explain it, you just don’t know it”. Does that apply to your way of teaching?

RONI BEN-HUR: Well, I try to find the best way to explain it, based on how I understood it; what helps me teach well is that I had lo learn a lot, so I could understand all the ambiguousness; you don’t usually understand what it means, and everytime I see students like that, I see myself in that, so I try to find the way to explain it, but I know two things; one, I can never explain it completely, and the next thing, I don’t know the truth. I always tell the students “I’m not telling you this is it, I’m telling you what I know and how I see it, and you’re going to hear that in many different ways and different things and they might be the truth, maybe there’s no truth.”

ARTURO MORA: Are you in touch with the Israeli Jazz scene?

RONI BEN-HUR: Not so much. Actually in New York I see a lot of Israeli musicians who come, more now than before. I think for Israelis it’s an easy transition into Jazz, because Israel is such a melting pot of so many different kinds of music and the rhythms of Jazz exist in those kind of rhythmic things that happen in the different traditional Israeli music, but I’m not in touch with the Israeli scene in Israel itself.

SERGIO CABANILLAS: Could you recommend us some names of Israeli musicians based in NYC and some from the NYC scene itself.

RONI BEN-HUR: There are so many… I’d hate to name names because I would miss so many people out… but I would say that there are a lot of wonderful new musicians in NY and there are so many different styles that they’re exploring, some of them are traditional Jazz, some of them incorporating world music, some incorporating traditional music… there are all kinds of things that happen in New York, and if somebody really wants to find out about different people in NY, find a New York Jazz calendar online and follow the links from the clubs to the different musicians, because there are so many…

SERGIO CABANILLAS: Sorry, but we need to learn ourselves… [laughs]

RONI BEN-HUR: Uff, that’s tough… well, there’s a piano player named Sasha Perry, a bass player named Ari Roland, an arranger named Chris Byars, there are so many, really a lot… everybody comes to New York, everybody gets attracted, incredible talents live there… I’d do a disjustice if I left so many out…

Roni Ben-Hur © Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

Roni Ben-Hur
© Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

SERGIO CABANILLAS: What made you choose tradition instead of experimentation? What could be your future ways of development in your music career?

RONI BEN-HUR: Roots is a very important word here. Bebop have been my roots for the last twenty years, but there are also the twenty years before that, and those roots are coming out also in the music, and I think that what happened in my last few recordings is that I was more aware of what music wants to come out and what music I’m attracted to, and I stopped worrying about what am I supposed to play and more about what I want to play. In the future I think I’ll do more of the same, more compositions and arranging – I really enjoy arranging – and I’d like to do projects that incorporate more classical music, more ethnic music as well as traditional Jazz.

ARTURO MORA: What are your criteria to choose a bass player and a drummer?

RONI BEN-HUR: Well, they have to swing, they’ve to have a great sound, and they have to be great listeners. They can’t be boxed in. I could play with a drummer who just thinks in one form, like Bebop or Jazz, but I like a drummer who thinks beyond that.

ARTURO MORA: How do you build up a repertoire for a recording session?

RONI BEN-HUR: For a recording session, you usually know three or four months ahead of time that you’re going to do a record. I start building up a list of songs, things that maybe before that time I was thinking that I’d like to do, and usually forty percent of that stays in the end. I stay involved in thinking about it throughout those weeks and the instrumentation… and then certain songs come to mind, and it could be three months or two weeks before the recording when it all comes together. It’s a process that never ends until the recording comes about. Whatever it is, it has to be something that is really moving to me, something that I feel very involved in. It can’t be something that I do because I think “oh, it’s a good idea to include it” or “it’s a song that would sell well” or “somebody wants me to play that”.

ARTURO MORA: And what about the gigs, are they something pre-determined or do you decide as you go along during the show?

RONI BEN-HUR: No, I can go to a gig with certain tunes in mind that I’d like to play, but it has to be flexible, you have to see the audience, you have to see what they respond to, what kind of audience you have, what the time is… you have to be flexible in a way that you don’t stick to a list, because sometimes maybe a ballad is due, maybe you want to start with an up tune but maybe a bossa nova would be better, so maybe there’s a pool of songs that you pull from, but you don’t necessarily have to say the order. Sometimes you make an order and it works, but you have to be flexible.

Roni Ben-Hur © Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

Roni Ben-Hur
© Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

Roni Ben-Hur © Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

Roni Ben-Hur
© Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

 ARTURO MORA: Tell us about the new album: the process, your feelings, what do you expect from it, who plays in it…

RONI BEN-HUR: The CD actually came about thanks to a student of mine who wanted me to do a CD and he decided that he would produce it. Then it came down to picking the musicians, I went back and forth and I thought different things and I’m very, very happy with the people on the CD. I have Ronnie Mathews on piano – Ronnie is somebody who’s been in the music for a long time, played with a lot of great musicians –, Jeremy Pelt, he’s a young trumpet player – I think he’s maybe thirty years old – and he’s really making a big splash in the United States, with a beautiful sound and concept; the bass player is Santi DeBriano, he’s a wonderful player, yet another musician who deserves wider recognition and also as a composer and arranger; he and I have worked together before this recording a few times and I fell in love with his sound; the drummer is Lewis Nash, everybody in Jazz knows him, he’s probably the most famous Jazz drummer of the day, great drummer, wonderful, and great sensitivity, and the percussionist is the guy who played with me in Signatures, Steve Kroon, also a wonderful percussionist with great sensitivity. Recording was wonderful, the process was great, we did it in two days and they were two days of joy.

SERGIO CABANILLAS: About your student-producer, musicians 20,000 miles around must be green with envy… [laughs]

RONI BEN-HUR: You know, there’s a lot of people who are deeply affected by the music, and they want to give something back, and they look for ways to do it, and then they look at the Jazz industry and it’s very discouraging. I think a lot of them go about it in the wrong way of saying “well, let’s find a label to put the CD out first”, “let’s find a venue to promote the CD first”, and I think they’ll get more done if they would just say “let’s make the CD”. It’s important that this people who really love the music and want to do something about the music say: “let’s just do it!”, so it gets created, like a painter: “I don’t know where I’m going to put it, I don’t know what museum is going to carry it”, but, please, paint it. Same thing with musicians and then things will fall into place.

Roni Ben-Hur © Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

Roni Ben-Hur
© Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

SERGIO CABANILLAS: Some people have an idealized image about the NYC Jazz scene, and as far as we know, things are not that way. How do you see the NYC scene these days?

RONI BEN-HUR: It’s a very, very tough scene. You really have to want to be there, because it takes a long time to find your place in there. Sure there are exceptions, some people find their place immediately and become stars, but for every one person who you hear who has great records and they’re distributed all over the world, there are a thousand who are not. I like the story of a friend of mine, Leroy Williams, the drummer who played with me on a few of my records, he told me that one day he was very discouraged and he went to see Art Blakey, and Art Blakey saw that he was discouraged, he could feel it, and he told him “Leroy, you have to remember why you play this music. You don’t play it for fame, you don’t play it for money, you’re playing it because you love the music”, and that can help in the hard times.

© 2007 Sergio Cabanillas y Arturo Mora Rioja
Agradecimientos: Héctor García Roel




Roni Ben-Hur: Expandiendo la tradición, por Sergio Cabanillas y Arturo Mora.

Keepin' It Open

Keepin’ It Open

El pasado mes de febrero el guitarrista Roni Ben-Hur, de origen israelí, ofreció tres conciertos y participó en un seminario de jazz en Madrid. Colaborador habitual del pianista Barry Harris, Ben-Hur está a punto de publicar su cuarto CD, Keepin’ It Open (Motema), en el que le acompañan Ronnie Mathews, Lewis Nash, Santi DeBriano, Jeremy Pelt y Steve Kroon. Ben-Hur, que cuenta con un considerable bagaje docente, publicará a lo largo de la próxima primavera un nuevo método sobre conceptos armónicos para guitarra de jazz.

Durante su estancia en Madrid, el 1 de febrero de 2007, Sergio Cabanillas entrevistó a Ben-Hur en su programa de radio “Universos Paralelos” de Onda Verde (Madrid 107,9 FM). El programa –en el que sonaron nuevas piezas de Keepin’ It Open– contó además con la presencia de Arturo Mora (Tomajazz) y el guitarrista Héctor García Roel.

Roni Ben-Hur / Arturo Mora / Sergio Cabanillas / Hector García Roel © 2007 Haim Ben-Hur

Roni Ben-Hur / Arturo Mora / Sergio Cabanillas / Héctor García Roel
© 2007 Haim Ben-Hur

ARTURO MORA: Naciste en Israel, pero tu familia viene de Túnez. En tu página web hablas sobre la importancia de la parte festiva de la música en tu familia. Si tuvieras que comparar el aspecto intelectual del jazz con su parte más festiva, ¿cuál desequilibraría la balanza?

RONI BEN-HUR: Creo que es muy importante combinar ambos aspectos, que eso es lo que hace que la música sea lo que es. La parte festiva del jazz viene de la gente, es música que viene de la gente, no necesariamente gente que haya estudiado música, no necesariamente gente que haya ido al Conservatorio, sino gente que haya entrado en la música a través de su tradición, de su hogar, de sus iglesias; eso es lo que le da al jazz el elemento de espontaneidad y originalidad, el hecho de que todo el mundo pueda ser muy individual. Y el hecho de que es música que se estudia, que los músicos invierten su tiempo en expandir su conocimiento sobre ella, es lo que la hace tan sofisticada.

ARTURO MORA: Hablando sobre el desarrollo del jazz, en el álbum que estás a punto de publicar hay una canción tradicional israelí, hay bossa nova, hay un tema español de Enrique Granados, y en el CD anterior, Signatures, había dos composiciones de Heitor Villa-Lobos y otra de Jobim. ¿Cuál es el reto para Roni Ben-Hur cuando adapta al lenguaje del jazz temas que fueron concebidos en otros territorios musicales?

RONI BEN-HUR: Creo que el reto no lo es tanto siempre y cuando no trates de ser purista. Antes de la llegada de los equipos de grabación, el único medio de transmisión de la música era la escritura. Y aun así había espacio para las interpretaciones. La gente podía interpretar la música de los compositores, y rearreglarla. Creo que muchas piezas se prestaban a ello, y no solamente a tocarlas nota por nota según la concepción original del arreglo.

ARTURO MORA: ¿Qué temas de otros contextos musicales te gustaría adaptar en un futuro cercano?

RONI BEN-HUR: Bueno, no te podría decir qué sería. Sé que hay antiguas canciones tradicionales israelíes que me gustaría hacer, y también música de la literatura religiosa, de la literatura religiosa sefardí. Siempre me he sentido muy cercano a la música española, y al flamenco también, pero realmente no podría decir qué incluiría en mi próximo proyecto.

Roni Ben-Hur © Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

Roni Ben-Hur
© Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

ARTURO MORA: ¿Qué destacarías de lo que has aprendido tocando con Barry Harris?

RONI BEN-HUR: Que la música está ahí por la belleza, está ahí para conmover y emocionar a la gente. Debe conmover a la gente en un nivel emocional, no impresionarles en un nivel intelectual.

ARTURO MORA: Has tocado con pianistas como Barry Harris, John Hicks, Chris Anderson… Armónicamente, ¿cómo combinas la guitarra y el piano?

RONI BEN-HUR: No es difícil si escuchas. La gente que has mencionado tiene una gran capacidad de escucha, y hay algo más que he aprendido de ellos: mientras escuches no es tan difícil, es como dos personas muy brillantes en un tema concreto, que pueden tener una conversación y presentar una idea juntos. Si la persona con la que tocas te escucha, y siempre es receptiva a lo que estás haciendo, entonces siempre hay espacio para lo que hagas.

SERGIO CABANILLAS: Desde un punto de vista técnico, más allá de escuchar e interactuar, ¿cómo distribuyes el trabajo armónico cuando estás tocando con un pianista para que nadie “pise” el rango del otro?

RONI BEN-HUR: No creo que haya una regla fija. La forma fácil de salir del paso es que el piano haga la armonía. El siguiente recurso fácil es intercambiar, en otras palabras: en algunos puntos toca el piano, en otros toca la guitarra; pero la forma más gratificante es combinar, estar alerta y escuchar constantemente, y ser muy sensible al otro, entonces funciona.

SERGIO CABANILLAS: Entonces se puede concebir como compartir el registro: ¿menos peso en la mano izquierda del piano mientras la guitarra toca cuerdas graves y viceversa en las notas agudas?

RONI BEN-HUR: Sí, pero no se tiene que determinar de antemano. Todos estos problemas se solucionan solos cuando se escucha. Si lo fijas de antemano pero no escuchas, no te servirá.

SERGIO CABANILLAS: ¿Cómo te sientes tras la pérdida de John Hicks?

Roni Ben-Hur © Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

Roni Ben-Hur
© Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

RONI BEN-HUR: Ha sido muy duro. Cuando John se fue –no hace mucho, de hecho toqué con él un par de semanas antes– me cogió por sorpresa. Me sentía muy cercano a él, era un amigo íntimo. Fui a su funeral en la Iglesia de St. Peter en Nueva York (algo así como la Iglesia del Jazz), en la que se celebran los funerales de músicos de Jazz; todos los que intervinieron hablaron sobre lo cercano y buen amigo que era John Hicks. Para mí fue una lección ver qué gran persona era, y qué gran homenaje a su vida es que toda la gente con la que tuvo contacto sintiera que era su mejor amigo.

SERGIO CABANILLAS: ¿Y en el aspecto musical?

RONI BEN-HUR: Musicalmente fue genial trabajar con él. Era un pianista de primera clase, compositor, arreglista y líder, pero cuando trabajaba en mi banda e hicimos el disco, era totalmente receptivo a cualquier cosa que yo quisiera hacer, y todo su propósito era que yo consiguiera el sonido que estaba buscando.

ARTURO MORA: Acerca de tu mujer, Amy London, la gran cantante de Jazz y de Broadway, ¿qué influencia musical ha ejercido sobre ti?

RONI BEN-HUR: Claro, ella es una gran cantante y tiene un nuevo CD con John Hicks. Debería salir en mayo. Me ha influido de muchas formas, y he crecido musicalmente con ella por el mero hecho de trabajar con una gran cantante. También me ha puesto en contacto con el gran cancionero americano, la literatura de Broadway, los musicales y las películas de los años treinta, cuarenta y cincuenta.

Roni Ben-Hur © Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

Roni Ben-Hur
© Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

ARTURO MORA: Has publicado un libro sobre guitarra de Jazz llamado Talk Jazz (“Habla Jazz”). ¿Qué diferencia hay entre “tocar Jazz” y “hablar Jazz”?

RONI BEN-HUR: Hablas jazz si tocas Jazz bien. El libro se llama Talk Jazz porque aborda directamente el lenguaje y el vocabulario del mundo del Jazz. Trata de ayudar a los estudiantes a ponerse en contacto con el vocabulario, formas específicas de tocar cosas que suenen en el lenguaje del Jazz; no sólo conceptos teóricos, sino frases musicales correctas.

ARTURO MORA: Como docente de Jazz, ¿aprendes enseñando? ¿Qué opiniones te dan tus alumnos?

RONI BEN-HUR: Aprendo mucho de mis alumnos. Cuando enseñas algo y lo cuentas, de algún modo te desprendes de ello, y algo nuevo tiene que remplazarlo, así que sigues creciendo. También, siempre que enseñas algo, lo escuchas y lo examinas otra vez, y reaprendes las cosas, es un proceso de crecimiento completamente distinto.

ARTURO MORA: En docencia, hay una máxima que dice: “Si no sabes explicarlo, no lo sabes”. ¿Esto se puede aplicar a tu método de enseñanza?

RONI BEN-HUR: Bueno, intento encontrar la mejor forma de explicar, basándome en cómo lo he entendido yo; lo que me ayuda a explicar bien es que tuve mucho que aprender, así que pude comprender toda la ambigüedad; generalmente uno no entiende lo que significan las cosas, y cada vez que veo a mis alumnos así, me veo reflejado en ellos, así que intento encontrar la forma de explicarlo. Pero sé dos cosas; una: nunca lo puedo explicar por completo, y la siguiente, que no conozco la verdad. Siempre digo a mis alumnos: “No os estoy diciendo que esto sea así, os estoy contando lo que sé y cómo lo veo yo, y vosotros vais a escuchar eso de muchas formas distintas, y a lo mejor son ciertas, o a lo mejor la verdad no existe”.

ARTURO MORA: ¿Estás en contacto con la escena jazzística israelí?

RONI BEN-HUR: No mucho. Ahora mismo veo a muchos músicos israelíes que vienen a Nueva York, más que antes. Creo que para los israelíes la transición hacia el Jazz es fácil, porque Israel es como un crisol de muchos tipos distintos de música, y los ritmos del Jazz existen en esa clase de cosas rítmicas que ocurren en las distintas músicas tradicionales israelíes, pero no estoy en contacto con la escena israelí que hay en Israel.

SERGIO CABANILLAS: Recomiéndanos algunos nombres de músicos israelíes que estén en Nueva York, y también de otros músicos de la escena neoyorquina.

RONI BEN-HUR: Hay tantos… No me gustaría dar nombres, porque me dejaría a tanta gente fuera… pero yo diría que hay un montón de buenos músicos nuevos en Nueva York, y hay tantos estilos diferentes que están explorando… algunos de ellos hacen Jazz tradicional, otros incorporan músicas del mundo, algunos música tradicional… Hay tantas cosas que pasan en Nueva York… Si alguien realmente quiere averiguar quién hay en Nueva York, que busque un calendario de Nueva York en Internet y siga los enlaces de los músicos en las páginas de los clubes, porque hay tantos…

SERGIO CABANILLAS: Lo siento, pero tenemos que aprender… (risas)

RONI BEN-HUR: Uff, qué difícil… Bueno, hay un pianista llamado Sasha Perry, un bajista llamado Ari Roland, un arreglista llamado Chris Byars, hay tantos, realmente un montón… Todo el mundo va a Nueva York, a todo el mundo le atrae, allí viven talentos increíbles… No hago justicia dejando a tantos fuera…

Roni Ben-Hur © Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

Roni Ben-Hur
© Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

 SERGIO CABANILLAS: ¿Qué te hizo elegir la tradición en vez de la experimentación? ¿Cuáles podrían ser tus futuras vías de desarrollo en tu carrera musical?

RONI BEN-HUR: “Raíces” es una palabra importante para mí. El bebop ha constituído mis raíces durante los últimos veinte años, pero antes hubo otros veinte años, y esas raíces también están apareciendo en la música, y creo que lo que pasó en mis últimas grabaciones es que yo estaba más alerta de qué música quería aparecer, y de qué música me atrae más, y dejé de preocuparme sobre lo que se supone que debo tocar, y me centré en lo que quería tocar. En el futuro creo que haré más de lo mismo, más composiciones y arreglos –realmente disfruto arreglando– y me gustaría hacer proyectos que incorporen más música clásica, más música étnica y más Jazz tradicional.

ARTURO MORA: ¿Cuáles son tus criterios para elegir un bajista y un batería?

RONI BEN-HUR: Bueno, deben tener swing, deben tener un gran sonido, y deben escuchar mucho. No pueden ser encasillados. Yo podría tocar con un batería que sólo piense de una forma, como Bebop o Jazz, pero me gustan los baterías que piensan más allá.

ARTURO MORA: ¿Cómo eliges el repertorio de una sesión de grabación?

RONI BEN-HUR: Para una sesión de grabación, generalmente sabes que vas a hacer un disco tres o cuatro meses antes. Empiezo montando una lista de canciones, cosas que a lo mejor llevaba tiempo pensando que me gustaría hacer, y habitualmente el cuarenta por ciento acaba quedándose. Pienso en ello durante todo ese tiempo, y en la instrumentación… y entonces algunas cosas rondan por la mente, y a lo mejor tres meses o dos semanas antes de la grabación todo se concreta. Es un proceso que nunca acaba hasta que se llega a la grabación. Sea lo que sea, tiene que ser algo que realmente me emocione, algo en lo que me sienta muy involucrado. No puedo hacerlo porque piense: “oh, incluir esto es una buena idea”, o “es una canción que venderá”, o “alguien quiere que toque esto”.

ARTURO MORA: En los conciertos, ¿el orden está predefinido o decides los temas dependiendo de cómo evoluciona el espectáculo?

RONI BEN-HUR: No, puedo ir a un concierto con ciertos temas que me gustaría tocar en mente, pero tiene que ser algo flexible, tienes que ver al público, tienes que ver su respuesta, qué clase de público tienes, qué hora es… Tienes que ser flexible de forma que no te cierres en torno a una lista, porque a lo mejor a veces una balada es lo adecuado, a lo mejor quieres empezar con un tema rápido, pero quizás una bossa nova sería mejor; así que hay un fondo de temas de los que vas tirando, pero no tienes que establecer el orden obligatoriamente. A veces haces el orden y funciona, pero tienes que ser flexible.

Roni Ben-Hur © Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

Roni Ben-Hur
© Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

Roni Ben-Hur © Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

Roni Ben-Hur
© Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

 ARTURO MORA: Háblanos acerca del nuevo álbum: el proceso, tus sensaciones, qué esperas de él, quién toca…

RONI BEN-HUR: El CD salió por un alumno mío que quiso que yo hiciera un disco, y decidió producirlo. Entonces vino la elección de los músicos, fui buscando y pensé en cosas distintas, y estoy muy, muy contento con la gente que hay en el CD. Tengo a Ronnie Mathews al piano –Ronnie ha estado en la música durante mucho tiempo, ha tocado con un montón de grandes músicos–, Jeremy Pelt, que es un trompetista joven –creo que tiene treinta años– y realmente está causando sensación en Estados Unidos, con buen sonido y concepto; el bajista es Santi DeBriano, que es un bajista maravilloso, otro músico que merece mayor reconocimiento, también como compositor y arreglista; él y yo hemos trabajado juntos unas cuantas veces antes de esta grabación, y su sonido me tiene enamorado; el batería es Lewis Nash, todo el mundillo del Jazz le conoce, probablemente sea el batería de Jazz más famoso del momento, un gran batería, maravilloso, y de gran sensibilidad, y el percusionista es un tío que tocó conmigo en Signatures, Steve Kroon, también un percusionista excelente de gran sensibilidad. Grabar fue maravilloso, el proceso fue genial, lo hicimos en dos días y fueron dos días de alegría.

SERGIO CABANILLAS: Hablando sobre tu estudiante, los músicos en 30.000 kilómetros a la redonda deben estar verdes de envidia… [risas]

RONI BEN-HUR: Sabes, a mucha gente la música le conmueve, y quieren corresponder de alguna manera, y buscan formas de hacerlo, y entonces miran a la industria del Jazz y la encuentran muy descorazonadora. Creo que muchos de ellos toman el camino equivocado y dicen: “primero vamos a buscar una compañía que saque el CD”, “busquemos primero una sala donde promocionar el CD”, pero creo que acabarían haciendo más si sencillamente dijeran: “hagamos el CD”. Es importante que a esta gente a la que realmente le gusta la música y quiere hacer algo al respecto diga: “hagámoslo”. Como si fuera un pintor: “no sé dónde pondré el cuadro, no sé qué museo lo exhibirá”, pero, por favor, píntalo. Hagamos lo mismo con los músicos, y las cosas funcionarán.

Roni Ben-Hur © Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

Roni Ben-Hur
© Sergio Cabanillas, 2007

SERGIO CABANILLAS: Hay gente que tiene una imagen idealizada sobre la escena jazzística de Nueva York, y en la medida en que la conocemos, las cosas no son así. ¿Cómo ves la escena neoyorquina hoy en día?

RONI BEN-HUR: Es una escena muy, muy dura. Realmente tienes que querer estar en ella, porque encontrar tu sitio allí lleva mucho tiempo. Por supuesto que hay excepciones, hay gente que encuentra su sitio inmediatamente y se convierte en estrella, pero por cada persona que tiene grandes discos que se distribuyen por todo el mundo, hay mil a los que no les pasa. Me gusta la historia de un amigo mío, Leroy Williams, el batería que toca conmigo en varios de mis discos: me dijo que una vez estaba muy desanimado y fue a ver a Art Blakey, y Art Blakey se dio cuenta, podía sentirlo, y le dijo: “Leroy, tienes que recordar por qué tocas esta música. No la tocas por la fama, no la tocas por el dinero, la tocas porque amas la música, y eso te puede ayudar en los momentos duros”.

© 2007 Sergio Cabanillas y  Arturo Mora Rioja
Agradecimientos: Héctor García Roel